Post#16 The story behind a chair

What people can do with their hands… that’s something I’ve always been fascinated by…

I’ve always wished I had the ability to do simple things as writing with a typography that I like, braid someone’s hair or play those hand clapping games at school. Even if I made tones of exercises on how to write like an architect, I still write like a doctor. I do love to sketch and write though, I love the gradual amount of pressure you can give to the pen and each time you write is a new opportunity to create a different font! So I don’t care if it looks like a kid’s draft if I actually enjoyed creating a line, a circle, a letter, a plan!

I think, even capturing a good picture is a complete body collaboration, where the finger final click plays a vital role.

What you want to do and what you are able to do is something very different, but when it comes to commanding your hands this fact seems to have even more meaning.

I truly admire people who can direct their hands as they want, it’s like they have a higher control of their entire body. The ability doesn’t necessarily lie in using them with precision… A lot of great cartoonists cannot even draw a straight line. It’s more about the freedom and trust you give to them when you perform any task, choosing between the mechanical and the improvised movements. It’s probably not only the control the brain has over the hands, but  the trust we give to our body’s own wisdom.

I specially admire craftsmen and I’m always surprised about the low credit we give to them. I think a lot of the problems of our contemporary society lies on the laziness of our imagination. We see a product and we rarely recreate the constructive process in our heads. When we buy something we’re not only buying that final object, we’re buying the whole process behind it and we should give credit to that story as well.

Yesterday, a wicker craftsman came to the office to fix our chairs, one was broken so my boss decided to replace the plastic for wicker for both chairs.

I’m happy to share this complex process that lead to a “simple” result.

The chair is ready
Chair’s structure
Material
Material
+ tools
+ tools
Machine designed in situ to give the right thickness to each wicker strip
Machine designed in situ to give the right thickness to each wicker strip
Building the machine
Building the machine
Thickness we want
Thickness we want
Working on each string
Working on each string
Wicker left over
Wicker left over
DSC06456

DSC06459

DSC06457

DSC06463

DSC06471

DSC06473

Most of these talented people are not able to pass their knowledge to the new generations, not even to t heir own kids, which was the way the all learned. If you have a craftsman job, you probably don’t have the standard to marry somebody from a higher cast.

This means, India is losing amazingly valuable people. Dam you mass production generation!

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2 responses to “Post#16 The story behind a chair

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